Bison Meat

USDA Bison Market Reports Bison Meat Recipes The Campsite and Processing Area Head Smashed In Buffalo Jump The flat area immediately below the kill site was where the hunters camped while they finished butchering the buffalo. A few tipi rings, the stones used to anchor tipis against the wind, can still be seen on the prairie level. It was here that meat was sliced into thin strips and hung on racks to dry in the sun. Large leg bones were smashed to remove the nutritious marrow, and the numerous boiling pits excavated by archaeologists in this area indicate these broken … Read more

Cheyenne

/ …..In the early 1870s, Colonel Edward W. Wynkoop urged that the slaughter must be terminated, because it is one of the greatest grievances the Indians have and, to my personal knowledge, frequently has been their strongest incentive to declare war. Little Robe, the Cheyenne chief who recently visited Washington, at one time remarked to me after I had censured him for allowing his young men to kill a white farmer’s ox: ‘Your people make big talk, and sometimes make war, if an Indian kills a white man’s ox to keep his wife and children from starving. What do you … Read more

1873

< Previous  Next>> “American Progress”  by George A. Crofutt c1873 Print shows an allegorical female figure of America leading pioneers westward, as they travel on foot, in a stagecoach, Conestoga wagon, and by railroads, where they encounter Native Americans and herds of bison.   Chicago Daily Tribune Chicago, Illinois Feb 16 1873 BISON BUTCHERY Tremendous Slaughter of Buffaloes in Southern Kansas – Doomed to Speedy Extinction From that Topeka (Kan.) Commonwealth. Dodge City, on the A.T. & S.F. road, is a principal point of shipment of buffalo meat and hides in Kansas. In fact, the trade of the town, apart … Read more

1870

<< Previous  Next>> Height of the Destruction Many Indians and whites considered buffalo tongues to be a great delicacy; western soldiers craved them. In 1870, General John Pope, new commander of the Department of the Missouri, wrote to his old West Point chum, Lieutenant Colonel Richard I. Dodge, in command at Fort Dodge, requesting twelve dozen buffalo tongues. Dodge quickly obliged by detailing a sergeant and a squad of marksmen to scour the Kansas plains for the shaggy beasts. In three days they returned with a wagon filled with more tongues than were ordered. To kill over 144 buffalo, animals … Read more