1811-1820


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1811-1820

The Freemans Journal April 13 1813

The_Freemans_Journal_April_13_1813_buffalo_hides

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The Maryland Gazette

May 4, 1815

Extract from Lewis and Clarke travels.

1811-1820 This extraordinary range of rocks we call the gates of the Rocky Mountains. We had made twenty two miles, and four and a quarter miles from the entrance of the gates. The mountains are higher today than they were yesterday. We saw some big-horns, a few antelopes and beaver, but since entering the mountains have found no buffalo; the auditor however are in great plenty; the mosquitoes have become less troublesome then they were.

Vol. I.p.310,311.

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The Evening Post Jan 31 1816

The Evening Post Jan 31 1816

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The Evening Post April 2 1816 (bales of skins)

The Evening Post April 2 1816

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The Pittsburgh Gazette Oct 1 1816

The Pittsburgh Gazette Oct 1 1816

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The Pittsburgh Gazette Jan 28 1817

The Pittsburgh Gazette Jan 28 1817

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The Maryland Gazette May 7 1818

ANOTHER NEW MONSTER

To Dr. Mitchell, the editors of the New York Gazette are indebted for a copy of the following letter, addressed to him by James Crawford, Esq.

Prairie des Chein, 25th Nov. 1817

Sir,

Understanding that you entertain a strong predilection for natural curiosities, I, at the particular request of a friend personally known to you, transmit you the subjoined relation, which you are at liberty to make use of as you may deem consistent.

Returning late last fall from the Indian hunting ground, sinated near the mouth of the River Street Peters, I had an occasion to go ashore at a particular rock, which forms the cave noticed in the Journal of the late Mr. Carver, with two of my hunters, when our attention was attracted by a noise, somewhat resembling the bellowing of a Buffalo at a distance. We immediately proceeded in search of the object, and on arriving at the mouth of the cave, encountered a serpent of most prodigious appearance, probably 15 feet high in length, and proportionable in thickness, with four short legs, somewhat resembling the alligator. His head was disproportionally larger, with glossy eyes situated towards the back of his head. The back was of a shining black, covered with strong and apparently impenetrable scales. The belly was variegated with different colors. It’s tail on perceiving us was coiled over the back, except when it beats the ground, which was always accompanied by the bellowing which first attracted us. It may be enquired, why we did not fire on it, which can be mostly easily defined by imagining the indescribable agitation which the menacing attitude of such an it extraordinary________ would excite. The whole______ stood with their muskets cocked transfixed with terror, and tell it quickly glided into the recess of the cave. But be assured Sir, that we _______ not abandoned the idea of obtaining it in the ensuing spring. A _________ is already formed for the  ______ who are determined to brave ___ risk to gratify their curiosity ______ expecting this wonderful creature ______ should we succeed, on may dep______ on receiving a minute deline_____ as well as a faithful recital ____of circumstances attendant on the expedition.

I am, Sir, with respect your obedient servant, James Crawford

Dr. Samuel L Mitchell, New York

 

THE MAMMOTH

From the Emigrant, published at Louis.

Prairies des Chein, Match 18

Sir,

The present appears to be an ___ fruitful and curiosities, on the _____ as well as on the deep. I take _____liberty to send you for publication a copy of a letter to Dr. Mitchell, written by a gentleman of New York, who has been for some time past, of sojourner in the wilds of

_____ per Mississippi. This strange ____ count which he very gives of ____ reappearance of the Mammouth, the causes of so great commotion among the wild animals – will affo___

to the naturalist matter of de___ speculation, and excite in the public generally, equal curiosity with the recent appearance of the great serpent on the shores of the Atlantic.

I am, Sir, your obedient servant, & c.

Praire des Chein, March 1 1818,

Dr. Samuel L Mitchell,

Sir,

Believing that the occurrence which happened in this country, wi___

not be uninteresting to you, suffe___ me to describe to you the emigration of the Buffalo and the recent appearance of a large animal, supposed to be the Manmouth.

Do not be too surprised at the mention of a quadruped so famed for its size, and which has long since been considered extinct. Tho____ the present age is only acquainted with the skeleton of the Mammoth there is strong grounds for believing the present existence of this once formidable and gigantic animal. Various Indian accounts have lately reached us of its having been seen on the Big Prairie, and not far from the head of the Redwood River, which empties into River St. Peter’s. The latest account of it, is given us by the Sioux of the land, (as they are termed) a wandering band of the Sioux nation. They describe it as being far superior in size to the Buffalo, or any known animal that abounds on the Mississippi or its waters. On seen this animal the Indians were alarmed and terrified. They conceived it to be the Matchi Manitou or evil spirit. Besides the attention which the appearance of this animal has excited, the minds of the people here have been awakened at the site of numerous animals, that are collected to, and surrounded this place. What has given rise to this great commotion of the animal kingdom in this quarter of our country, will appear difficult to explain. From some cause or other the animals have been much disturbed; and being either impelled by fright, or the want to __sistence, have wandered from their unaccustomed abodes, and sought a shelter in this neighborhood. The deer, the panthers, and the bears, are now seen around us, and greater plenty than has ever yet been known. The Buffalo which has long since been driven off the Indian hunting grounds, and sought security from the Savage Hunter, by retreating West, have lately crossed the Mississippi nigh this place, inconsiderable herds; and are traveling towards the lake frontier.

To account satisfactorily for the extraordinary emigration of animals and the recent appearance of this supposed manmmoth (which the Indian traders say, came from the unexplored regions of the Northwest) will be deemed it difficult. But I think one probable conjecture is, that earthquakes have been the principal cause. We have felt several light shocks here; and have received accounts of dreadful earthquakes in the West.

Milledgeville, April 18

Latest from the Army.

A letter from Gen Mascock to the editors of the Journal, dated

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The Pittsburgh Gazette  Oct 16 1818 70 bales

The Pittsburgh Gazette Oct 16 1818 70 bales

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The Pittsburgh Gazette Nov 17 1818 

The Pittsburgh Gazette Nov 17 1818 70 bales robes

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The Evening Post May 28 1819 buffalo tools

The Evening Post May 28 1819 buffalo tools

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The Maryland Gazette
Annapolis, Maryland
August 19, 1819
Ottawas of Lake Huron Story of Machiwita

{extracted}
To be happy, perhaps, is to be usefully active, with the power of vocational relaxation; and if the Indian, in the pursuit of the deer and the buffalo, is happy, I much question the principal that will go to trespass on ground given to him by inheritance and original occupation, because the wants of civilization require more land to cultivate, or the gratification of his avaricious neighbor.

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The Evening Post Nov 13 1819 1000 Robes

The Evening Post Nov 13 1819 1000 robes

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The Evening Post Nov 25 1819 1000 Robes

The Evening Post Nov 25 1819 1000 robes

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The Evening Post Dec 6 1819 1000 Robes

The Evening Post Dec 6 1819 1000 robes

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The Evening Post Dec 13 1819 1000 Robes

The Evening Post Dec 13 1819 1000 robes

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The Evening Post April 3 1820 1000 Robes

The Evening Post April 3 1820 1000 Robes