1905


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The Topeka Daily Capital Nov 10 1905

“BUFFALO” JONES AND HIS “CATTALO” ROBE

Topeka Man Has at Last Succeeded in Getting His New Fur Producing
Animals Scheme on a Business Basis

Special to the Capital.
……Washington, Nov. 9.- “Buffalo” Jones of Topeka has at last got his scheme for the preservation of the bison and the production of a new fur-bearing animal on a business basis, and in the course of a short while, perhaps a few months, the “cattalo robe” will commence to be regularly quoted on the market.
Mr. Jones passed through Washington this week and had a talk with President Roosevelt, who is much interested in everything relating to big game life in the West.
……Mr. Jones has already started a ranch down on the western edge of the Grand Canyon, where they are rearing buffalo and cattalo and carrying on experiments with Persian sheep. Possibly through the intervention of the President, Mr. Jones may get the loan of the buffalo bulls that will soon have to be thinned out of the Yellowstone Park herd, and this will mean a substantial addition to the breeding stock on the forest reserve grazing land.
……The pride of “Buffalo” Jones’s life just now is a cattalo robe that he is carrying on to New York to show some friends there and which he will afterwards take back west with him. Cut square, the skin is about eight feet each way, of a glossy blackish-brown, very soft and with hair not quite as long as a bear’s.
“Buffalo” Jones was game warden for Yellowstone park for some years, resigning his position last spring.

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The Anaconda Standard Dec 19 1905

CONGRESS AND THE BUFFALO

……The American Bison society, which was organized in New York City last week, hopes to secure government and individual aid in preserving the buffalo from extinction. Specifically, the society will appeal to congress for an appropriation large enough to provide one or more buffalo reservations – great tracts of land on which the animals may flourish, and increase, and multiplied. At present there are less than 1,000 of them in America outside of zoological gardens, and the owners are private citizens without inclosures of sufficient size to give up buffalo the range he needs. If the government will undertake the solution of the problem, say the naturalist, there will be no difficulty in warding off the destruction of the finest animals now existing. Ernest H. Baynes, the secretary of the society and its chief promoter, described at the New York meeting several experiments he had made to prove that buffaloes are superior to domestic cattle as draught beast. He borrowed to baby Bulls from the Corbin’s, who own a herd of 160 head in New Hampshire, and train them to the yoke. Within a few months they were entirely serviceable and could give points in pulling a load to any oxen of their own age. They were also drilled in single harness and throughout their rearing were cared for like ordinary calves. Once the government has acquired a herd and started to increase its numbers along proper lines, Mr. Baynes says the bison’s commercial value to the country will become established. Besides promising well as the draught animal, the buffalo furnishes meat that cannot be surpassed and fur robes that for certain purposes cannot be equaled by those from any other creature. With the breed systematically maintained, there could be a large output from time to time for these uses, the animals being distributed throughout the country as fast as they overflowed their reservations.

……With the sentimental reasons for preserving the buffalo, every American is familiar. Even at the animal were of no commercial worth, so fine a beast, and native product, should not be effaced from the earth. The danger that the private herds will disintegrate may not be immediate, but it is certain the strength of the breed will gradually diminish unless the animals can have the freedom and wide range their nature requires. In addition to the weakening of the bison from being shut into small inclosures, his owners are hastening his and by selling in a occasional herd or hide. A buffalo robe these days brings from $150-$200. I head, well mounted, cost $800 or $900 in a taxidermist shop. It is no small temptation to the owner when a buyer drops in once or twice a year and offers him fancy prices for a few of the animals.
The American Bison society is assured of the active interest of Pres. Roosevelt, and an appeal to Congress for reservation an appropriation should not be in vain.

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The Gastonia Gazette NC Dec 22 1905

SOCIETY TO SAVE BISON

Plans of Organization Supported by President Roosevelt.

MOVEMENT STARTED AT NEW YORK

Congress Will Be Appealed to For an Appropriation to Provide Reservations For Maintaining Herds of Buffalo – American Mammal’s Commercial as Well as Sentimental Value to Be Urged.

……Supported by President Roosevelt and by the leading naturalist of the country, the American Bison society was organized recently at a meeting in the New York zoological gardens, Bronx park, says the New York Post. The object of the founders is to secure government and individual aid in preserving the bison, which is rapidly becoming extinct in the land where once his breed roved the plains by millions.
After securing as large a membership and as many contributions as possible, the society will appeal to congress for an appropriation large enough to provide one or more bison reservations- great tracts of land on which the animals may flourish and multiply. At present there are less than 1,000 of them in America outside of zoological gardens, and the owners are private citizens without enclosures of sufficient size to give a buffalo the range he needs. If the government will undertake the solution of the problem, say the naturalist, there will be no difficulty in warding off the destruction of the finest animals now existing.
……At the meeting in the Bronx, Mr. Roosevelt was chosen honorary president of the society. He had agreed previously to accept the office on condition the active list should be composed of the proper men, and ever since the plan was broached to him by Ernest Harold Baynes he has been enthusiastic over its outcome. The other officers elected were William P. Hornaday, president: Professor Charles S. Minot of Harvard university and president A.A. Anderson of the Campfire Club of America, vice presidents: Ernest Harold Baynes, secretary, and Edward Seymour, treasure.
……Speaking of the reasons for the movement to save the bison, Mr. Baynes described several experiments he had made to prove that the animals were superior to domestic cattle as draft beast. He borrowed to baby bulls from the Corbin’s, who own a herd of 160 head in New Hampshire, and trained then to the yoke. Within a few months they were entirely serviceable and could give points to pulling a load to any oxen of their own age. They were also drilled in single harness, and throughout their rearing were cared for like ordinary calves.
……Once the government has acquired after herd and started to increase its numbers along proper lines, Mr. Baynes says, the bison’s commercial value to the United States will become established. Besides promising well as a draft animal, the buffalo furnishes meat that cannot be surpassed and fur robes that for certain purposes cannot be equaled by those from any other creature. With the breed systematically maintained there could be a large output from time to time for these uses, the animals being distributed throughout the country as fast as they overflowed their reservations.
……Of the sentimental reasons for saving the bison much has been said, but hitherto no practical step has been taken for his preservation. Every one knows how his progenitors, when there were millions of them, serve the western pioneers for food when no other food was obtainable and gave winter clothing to the first settlers when a buffalo hide was the most easily procured and often the only covering to be had. Even if they were of no commercial worth, as Mr. Baynes says, Americans who know of their part in the country’s history should not like to see them effaced from the earth.
……The danger that the private herds will disintegrate may not be immediate, but it is certain the strength of the breed will gradually diminish and less the animals can have the freedom and wide range their natures require. Besides the herd in New Hampshire, there are large ones in Montana, and Texas and smaller ones in other western states. The Montana herd, owned by a half Indian named Pablo, is said to be the largest, numbering 225. It is not known, however, that these are all full-blooded. ……The “cattalo” which is domestic cattle and half wild buffalo, has come to be a common animal in the herds, and some owners have made a special effort to raise these crosses, which are noted for their valuable hides. In addition to the weakening of the bison from being shut into small inclosures, his owners are hastening his end by selling and occasional head or hide. A buffalo robe these days brings from $150-$200. A head, well mounted, cost $800 or $900 in a taxidermist shop. It is no small temptation to the owner when a buyer drops in once or twice a year and offers him fancy prices for a few of the animals.
……Mr. Baynes says be appeal to congress for reservation and an appropriation will be made as soon as possible. In the meantime a committee will confer with President Roosevelt.