Trading Post

Just In !!….AAB Ballcaps. Since AAB finally has a logo that I can get behind and it truly represents what we are about, I have had some caps made. Wes Olsen, a famous author, and artist was kind enough to make my new logo happen.  He wore one of my new caps at the recent  Canadian Bison Association conference. He was there in part to promote his new book. Which is incredible and can be had on Amazon in either Canada or the US.    My new logo, by Wes, is of Woods, Plains, and European Bison  (left to right) … Read more

Furriers – Tanners

Starting with the History Thinking about it…to come to a new country and carve out a living. Not much in the way of jobs and money. There were a lot of tanners, they used the hides to trade for other things they needed or wanted. Several of the earliest became very wealthy. In 1750’s half dressed deer skins averaged  2 to 2.5 lbs and sold for 40 cents a pound, roughly a dollar per hide. It was not uncommon for a buffalo hide to sell for 10 livres (franks). Winter elk , bear and buffalo hides were not sought after, as … Read more

Natives

While checking for information about the Natives of North America, you can use the search bar for the keyword to locate more stories for that year or tribe. Most Recent Articles on the bottom.   Announcement: We have an Old Native Bison Skull that we need help in researching. Please take a look and let us know if you can help. Any information would be greatly appriciated. Thank you. Native Painted Bison Skull.   Native languages was the source for most of the buffalo/bison terms below. In Plains Indian languages in general, male and female buffaloes are distinguished, with each … Read more

1811-1820

<< Previous  Next>> Hide Shipments 1811-1820 Aberdeen Journal North of Scotland Aberdeen Scotland Jan 16 1811 Lots of Hides Dried buffalo hides in the hair, sound in the grain, about 20lb per hide. Dried Spanish Horse Hides in the hair, fit for tanning or covering trunks. A few dozen of Dutch Calf Skins salted, about 136lb per doz.   The Caledonian Mercury Edinburgh, Scotland Mar 25th 1811 50 buffalo hides  Missouri Gazette and Public Advertiser St Louis, MO June 27, 1811 FOR SALE The following articles, the property of the United States, now on hand. VIZ. About 200 packs of … Read more

Crow

Crow Chief Plenty Coups Old-Man-Coyote (isa ka-wuate) (Supreme Being) showed people how to make fire; he took dried buffalo chips and decayed wood and drilled till the friction produced a fire. Crow Chief Plenty Coups described the mood of his people to his biographer, Frank B. Linderman: “[When] the buffalo went away, the hearts of my people fell to the ground.…After this, nothing happened. There was little singing anywhere.” Read more.. at Indian Country   Defending Crow lands in Washington, D.C., promoting education Plenty Coups (otherwise known as Aleek-chea-ahoosh) (1848 – 1932) was a Crow chief and visionary leader. He … Read more

Cheyenne

/ …..In the early 1870s, Colonel Edward W. Wynkoop urged that the slaughter must be terminated, because it is one of the greatest grievances the Indians have and, to my personal knowledge, frequently has been their strongest incentive to declare war. Little Robe, the Cheyenne chief who recently visited Washington, at one time remarked to me after I had censured him for allowing his young men to kill a white farmer’s ox: ‘Your people make big talk, and sometimes make war, if an Indian kills a white man’s ox to keep his wife and children from starving. What do you … Read more

Canada History

Pages: 1 2 Henry Kellsey, a factor of the Hudson Bay Company, in a report of his explorations in the far west of Canada, in 1691, tells of his party sighting buffalo in large numbers. A few years later this explorer became the first white buffalo hunter on the plains of western Canada. He tells that everywhere the Indians were slaughtering, taking only the choice pieces and leaving the greater portion of each slain body to the wolves which followed in large bands. The Saturday News May 21, 1914    In 1786 statistics show that over 705,000 skins were exported from Québec … Read more

C.J. Jones -“Buffalo Jones”

Grand Canyon Bison Herd- Started by Jones Yellowstone Park Charles Jesse Jones “Buffalo Jones” was born in 1844, in Illinois, the firstborn of twelve kids. He attended college for two years until he became sick with typhoid fever.  1866 (22 years old) he moved to Kansas to work in the fruit tree nursery business. In 1869 he got married to  Martha Walton, and planted hedge and fruit trees. They had 4 kids (2 boys died)  and moved west, to north-central Kansas. In 1872 he moved to what is now Osborne county, on 160 acres, with his wife and only child.  … Read more

1912

<< Previous  Next>> The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Jan 14 1912 BROOKLYNITES TAKE LEAD IN GAME PRESERVATION Prof. Franklin Hooper is president of National Bison Association PLAN HERD FOR NEW YORK Many Persons Prominent on Long Island Belong to Society That Fosters Animals. It came out at the annual meeting of the American Bison Society, held at the American Museum of Natural History, in Manhattan, on Thursday last, that as a result of the efforts of the society, the number of bison in existence has increased from 1,300 to 2,750 in a period of four years. Professor Franklin W. Hooper, director … Read more

1911

<< Previous  Next>> Buffaloes on Antelope Island Contradict Plaint That Their Species Is Rapidly Becoming Extinct The Salt Lake Tribune, April 23, 1911 Eighteen Calves Added to the Herd This Spring: Queer Animals Live-in Natural Wild State: The Strenuous Career of “Boaz”, the Hybrid That Would Not Be Tamed; When Great Bands Dotted Western Plains ……18 little buffalo calves are doing their best to prove that the race of buffalo – or bison, as the naturalist still persist in calling the American buffalo – is not becoming extinct. These eighteen little buffalo calves were born this spring on Antelope Island, … Read more