From the Bison


From the bison. Natives & Whites, American Bison/Buffalo

The Indians used almost every piece of the buffalo in one way or another.

‘It gave its life so Indians could live. The buffalo’s generosity provided Indians with food and shelter. Indian people modeled the buffalo’s generosity, and it became fundamental to the economy of the American Indian.’

Richard B. Williams ~Oglala Lakota

BONES
BUCKSKIN
HAIR
RAWHIDE
PAUNCH (Rumen)HORNS
Knives
Winter Robes
Pillows
Containers
Wrappings (Meat)
Arrow Points
Awls
Tipi Liners
Medicine BallsShields
Buckets
Cups
Quirts
Tipi Covers
Doll StuffingBuckets
Collapsible Cups
Fire Carrier
TablewareTapestries
RopesMoccasin Soles
Basins
Powder-horn
ToolsSweatlodge CoverHair Pieces
Drums
CanteensSpoons
Shovels
ShirtsOrnaments
Splints
Ladles
Scrapers
Quivers
Moccasin Lining
Mortars
Headdresses
Pipes
Moccasin Tops
Pad Fillers
Cinches
Signals
Sleds
Leggings
Halters
Ropes
Toys
Saddle Trees
Dresses
BraceletsSheaths
Medication
Fleshing Tools
Cradles
Headdresses
Saddles
Scoops
Paintbrushes
Bridles
Saddle Blankets
Combs
Splints
Belts
Stirrups
Arrowheads
Bedding
Bull Boats
War Clubs
Bags
Masks
Game Dice
Backrests
Parfleche
ToysOrnaments
ToolsLariats
SheildsStraps
FertilzerCaps
Quirts
Snowshoes
Shrouds
Water Trough

“The Buffalo was part of us, his flesh and blood being absorbed by us until it became our own flesh and blood. Our clothing, our tipis, everything we needed for life came from the buffalo’s body. It was hard to say where the animals ended and the human began.”

John (Fire) Lame Deer, Oglala- Lame Deer Seeker of Visions, with Richard Erdoes, 1972

CHIPSTEETHTAILHOOVES & DEW CLAWSMUSCLE
SCROTUM
HEAD HIDEHEARTCALFBLADDER
FUELOrnamentsMedicine Switch

Glue
Glue
ContainersBowlSack (for dried meat)Fetal Calf (stew type dish)Medicine Bags
Smoke SignalsJewleryDecorations
Rattles
Bows
Rattles
Special TreatPouches
WhipsSpoonsThread
Fly BrushWind ChimesArrow-Ties
Game WheelCinches
Webbing Snowshoes
Jerky

Photo: Arapaho camp with buffalo meat drying Kansas, 1870

From the bison

TENDONSBEARD
SKULLTONGUE
GALL
HIND LEG SKIN
BLOOD
BRAIN
Sewing
Ornaments
Sun Dance
Prime Meat

Yellow Paints
Preshaped MoccasinSoups
Hide Tanning
BowstringsDolls
Medicine Prayers
Comb (rough side)Bile/Condiment
(mustard)
Puddings
Food
Mittens
RitualsSpecial TreatPaints

Raw morsels of the meat would have been snacked on while the butchering was taking place. Raw liver, kidney, eyes, belly fat, testicles, parts of the stomach, marrow from leg bones, gristle from snouts, hoofs of unborn calves and tissue from the sack they had been in.


MEATLIVERSTOMACHKIDNEYSSTOMACH CONTENTS
INTESTINESFATSTOMACH LINER
Immediate Use
TanningEaten RawFat SourceMedicines
StringTallow

Water Containers
Sausages
EatingBoiledMedicinePaintsJewleryHair Grease
Cooking Vessels
Cached Meat
RoastedEating (fresh)Cosmetic Aids
Jerky
Parts Dried Storage ContainersSoaps
Pemmican/WasnaSausage SkinsPemmican/Wasna
Lubricant
Candle Tallow
Back Fat (Special)

From the Bison

For the Indians, this animal was sacred and they honored  the buffalo through, dance and prayer ceremonies. Giving back to what they had been given. their whole way of survival and life.

 

Buffalo Dance

is an 1894 American 16-second black and white silent film shot in Thomas Edison’s Black Maria studio. It was produced by William K. L. Dickson
with William Heise as cinematographer, and features three Sioux warriors  named Hair Coat, Parts His Hair and Last Horse  dancing in a circle
while two other Native Americans accompany them with drums.